eating / health stuff

Checking in, week three

So, for those of you waiting with baited breath about news of my ongoing battle with my delicate tummy, the tummy is winning. I’m still on the low-FODMAP diet, and I haven’t cheated at all. But my tummy is still winning.

Chia seed spiced muffins

Chia seed spiced muffins

The thing is, I forgot (okay I didn’t forget… I rationalized) that my stupid stomach doesn’t like rice. But I figured that rice flour would be okay because it’s been processed to death. Sounds logical to me, right? And I figured brown rice flour would be better than white rice flour because… I really don’t know why. Maybe because it’s the only one they had one the shelf. So anyway, I’ve been making the recipes in the low-FODMAP cookbook for snacks and breakfasts so I can stay on track… like these totally delicious muffins pictured to the right. Totally delicious. I ate three of them warm out of the oven. And I enjoyed it! Until a few hours later, when my stomach reminded me that I’ve been eating way too much in the way of rice products. See, to most of the world, rice is fairly innocuous. People can eat rice right and left and have no problems with it at all. It’s the most harmless grain in the world. It’s what babies start out with! Not me. Nope. My stomach gets angry with me if I eat too much of it. And most of the recipes for this low-FODMAP diet call for, you guessed it… rice of some kind.

Frittata

Frittata

So now I have to ease back on the rice and find a different kind of flour that will produce the same results in baked products. The good news is, this low-FODMAP diet has given me the energy to cook my own food and experiment with things like gluten free, dairy free cooking. Who would have thought I’d excited about cooking again? And it’s for me… the hubs doesn’t like what I’m cooking so it’s just me eating this stuff. For example, today I made a frittata (like a big, baked omelette) which he might like but it has three things he dislikes in it — spinach, sweet potatoes, and blue cheese.  I happen to like all three, and it’s from my cookbook so I know I can eat it without disaster (hopefully, spinach is iffy). And there’s enough for breakfast for days. Dinner if I don’t feel up to cooking.

Also, with all of this cooking, I have food to feed my worm farm. Did I mention that I’d started a worm farm? I totally bought one because I’m not good at hobbling things like that together. Because eventually I will be growing stuff like spinach and sweet potatoes in my very own garden and fertilizer is good to have. So yeah, I looked it up and it’s way easy to do. The worm farm is sitting in my mud room just inside the front door. It’s thriving right now after three months (after I almost killed it the first month in my homemade version), so here’s to hoping I get some good compost out of it. I’ve used the worm juice for my plants and it’s worked pretty well.

That. That right there is how I feel.

That. That right there is how I feel.

Anyway, having the extra energy to cook and clean is nice… So there’s that. Well, except for the last few days when my digestive system has been exacting its revenge on me for daring to think I can sneak too much rice into it in the form of sweet, delicious baked goods. Not to mention some tasty risotto. Ha! That’ll learn me.  But all in all, now that I’m actually following the plan and not winging it like I did last time, I think this diet is working. I just have to stop rationalizing and know that there are certain foods that I simply cannot indulge in.  It’ll take a few days to get back to base, and then I’ll start anew. It’s not as simple as you’d think to replace one flour with another. For example, I shouldn’t eat soy products because of my thyroid — so soy flour is out. I need to stay away from flax products because of my bipolar, so flax seed is out. Now I need to avoid rice products. I tell y’all… my body hates me. Hates me! But, I like having the extra energy that sticking to the diet has given me, so I’ll stay on it. I’ve lost a few pounds too, but nothing to write home about. If I lose more than ten, I’ll get excited. Until then. I’m not dancing in the streets over it.

Stay tuned for further updates. ^_^

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20 thoughts on “Checking in, week three

  1. I was wondering how you were doing and how your new lifestyle is going. I am going to post about my experience with my pain and mood diary soon.

    I am so proud of you for hanging in there. Personally I think that we all have to find our own way and our own diet and lifestyle and suits us. No matter what others say or what they experience.

    I went to a RA meeting and learned my lesson there

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    • I hope your RA meeting wasn’t an unpleasant experience. Support groups can be a lifeline when dealing with a chronic illness. I’m thinking of starting one up here in my new town because I miss the one I had back in New Mexico.

      I look forward to hearing about your diet experience…

      Liked by 1 person

      • It was eye opening. 80% of the people there don’t believe that diet or lift changes can make a difference. Most of them told me to go on medication, even though it works for me. When I asked if they ever even tried, I learned that the most are not willing to make any sacrifices. It’s easier to swallow a pill or get an injection, instead of giving up diary products and other stuff.
        I thought that everybody dealing with a chronic illness or an autoimmune disorder should be more than anxious to try to live without meds. They aren’t, many don’t even try.

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        • I can understand them to a point. If I had to chose between a life of pain and giving up coffee, it would be an awful difficult choice. I love my coffee. I could almost say I’m addicted to it. Same with sugar and Diet Coke.

          Also, my medications for bipolar have some serious side effects that some people absolutely won’t put up with (like weight gain and mind fog), but I’d rather have those than insanity. So it’s a personal choice for each person. Don’t judge them too harshly. ^_^

          Liked by 1 person

          • Oh Gosh, do you think I am too harsh? Maybe…not sure. Giving up sugar was fairly easy, sodas not so much…giving up coffee nearly killed me :-). But…I finally found a decaf that I like. 1 out of 100 that I tried, so that’s reason to celebrate 🙂

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            • Trying to give up sugar nearly did me in. My mind could not conceive of a world without sweet stuff, and all of the artificial sweeteners taste like crap to me — especially Splenda *gag* — “tastes like sugar because it’s made from sugar” my ass. I can only stand Aspartame in Diet Coke (the Witch’s Brew) and the rest make me want to vomit. So it’s a matter of cutting back (as with this current eating plan) because I tried going without more times than I can count, and… yeah.

              Same with coffee. I had to give it up for months when I went on my current medications for bipolar because it turned me into a raging bitch from hell whenever I drank it, but it was a rough few months. I really wanted my coffee in the morning and nothing else was cutting it. I just missed having it and I figured if I was still craving it after three months, I must really need that coffee (our minds are tricky that way). So I tried it and I didn’t turn into a raging bitch from hell, so I started drinking it again. I’ve cut back on the amount I drink …down to one cup from three pots… okay, it’s a big cup, but it’s one cup! ^_^

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            • Raw organic honey, good quality maple syrup, organic Stevia, molasses, and a few lesser known natural sweeteners like chicory root. Sugar is a terrible addiction, makes us sicker than anything else. I still have sweets, mostly dark chocolate, I still make jams and marmalade..just different than before.

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            • Honey isn’t FODMAP friendly. I do love me some honey, but it doesn’t love me back. I can have it in small doses, but it can’t replace sugar in my diet. I can have maple syrup, but, like honey, it can’t take the place of sugar in say, baked goods.

              Stevia (like Splenda) SUCKS ROCKS and chicory root sucks harder.

              Molasses isn’t sweet at all. It’s bitter and nasty. I don’t know why people keep telling me it’s a good replacement for sugar. I use it in gingerbread and for flavoring but that’s about it.

              And yes, I’ve tried giving up sugar because I know it’s the one thing I’m really addicted too (aside from coffee). I’ve tried more times than I can count… the first time being when I was about thirteen. I’m forty-nine now. So… yeah. It’s a physical addiction much like being addicted to nicotine or any drug. Plus, we kinda need it to live, like salt. So it’s not as simple as saying, “I’m just not going to eat this anymore.” Especially since there are a lot of complex carbs that my body doesn’t digest and simple sugars are way easier on my stupid stomach.

              Liked by 1 person

            • But I bet you can eat things like apples and other fruits without curling up in a ball and wanting to die. ^_^ Everyone’s body is different. My stupid stomach doesn’t like certain fruits (the most popular and easiest to find in the stores of course) so I have to tread carefully. Everyone has to get their glucose from somewhere… My stupid stomach just happens to be happiest with the worst kind.

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            • I know I sound negative, but I’m not trying to be. The last time I gave up refined sugar was about four (could be five) years ago doing something called “The Whole 30” diet. Basically a paleo diet which was nothing but whole fruits, nuts, meats and juices for thirty days. I lasted 28 days with no cheating and ended up in the ER with a packed colon, severe constipation, and a bleeding rectum because my digestive system really doesn’t like unprocessed foods. I was in a lot of pain. I haven’t tried giving up processed sugar again. Just cutting back because, for me, it’s a matter of moderation, not elimination. ^_^

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            • I believe in moderations. I don’t think there is a one-fixes-all-diet. I think that’s why started my pain diary. I juiced for 10 days…got all out of my system and then I added stuff to my diet. When I reacted I cut it back out and tried a different approach. There are only a few things that I had to give up for good: coffee, refined sugar, Corn and soy, diary (but I can do skim milk products), vegetable oil and rice. Eggs harm me a little bit…but it’s doable if I don’t have them every day.

              I love my bullet, because I am not a big breakfast eater. I don’t do too many fruits, but vegetables and beats as well.

              I think everything that’s too one sided harms us. One thing however works like magic for me and that’s fermented foods. I make my own Kefir with skim milk. make fermented tea and some vegetables. It’s said that those probiotics help your gut or should cure a leaky gut.

              I am not a doctor, don’t know how it works or why it works…but I could tell the difference instantly. Love it, just love it.

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            • Yep, probiotics are great. I eat yogurt (which is FODMAP friendly) every day with my evening meds. It helps. And I love me some sauerkraut! Pickled eggs? Yum! But the hubs hates all things pickled, so it would be just me eating them. I’m still trying to get past having two separate menus for just the two of us.

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            • *Laughter here* so true. Most of the decaf I tried I spit out, didn’t even want to swallow it. I am so glad I found one that I can tolerate. I even tried it on my husband aka Guinea pig. Served it as regular coffee on Sunday and he didn’t notice. Go figure~!

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            • I tried half-caf at my Uncle’s suggestion for a while but even that doesn’t taste so hot.

              Seriously though, I can’t take pain medications, so whatever I do is to help ease the pain. It’s not a choice for me to “do this or take a pill” it’s “do this to ease the pain.” If it works, I’m in less pain. If it doesn’t it’s steady on course or I’m in more pain. And I have to weigh everything else that’s wrong with me against what I’m doing too. Which makes the flour issue such a pain in the neck. No soy because of the thyroid. No flax because of the bipolar. blah blah blah. There’s so much I *can’t* do that I hang on fiercely to the things I enjoy (like sugar and coffee).

              Liked by 1 person

  2. I’m sorry. I’ve been through every diet in the world and the answer is rarely in a special diet. It it pretty much always a matter of fat and calories and amount of food versus how many calories you burn in the course of a day. As we get older, women don’t burn much in the way of calories. It’s not because we are lazy. It’s because we aren’t men and don’t have all that long muscle working for us. There are no simple answers, no special diet that solves all the problems. You do need to find out what food is making you feel bad and stop eating it. It might be fat, or sugar, or whatever. Anything. It must be something you eat often and regularly — and which earlier in your life, didn’t bother you. Changing your diet completely makes it impossible to find the actual culprit, so you might want to try a more targeted process of elimination.

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    • I’m not dieting to lose weight… I’m doing the elimination diet to make my stomach stop hurting me, which is what the low-FODMAP diet is for. It’s specifically for people with IBS. I don’t care if I lose weight, though it would be nice, and my knees and back will thank me. I just thought I’d mention it because someone will always ask whenever I mention that I’m on an elimination “diet”.

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